CHAT Bands

CHAT Collective® Hand Bands

CHAT Collective® Hand Bands are color-coded rubber wristbands which are designed to be worn by verbal communicators to obtain information from or to discern the preferences of nonverbal and limited communicators. These portable and inexpensive tools are invaluable as back-up systems when Alternative and Augmentative Communications (AAC) devices are inaccessible or fail — or when a person with a communications challenge becomes separated from his or her caretaker. Please download our helpful tips on using CHAT Collective® Hand Bands!

“CHAT Collective® hand bands have revolutionized how I can work with non-verbal patients.  As a physical therapist, my job often involves hands-on stretching and selection of therapeutic activities.  I want all my sessions to be patient centered.  Instead of relying on facial expressions and my clinical kinesthetic knowledge,   I can now ask my patient “Does this feel like a stretch,” or “Is it too much of a stretch.” I can ask if a person’s back hurts in a specific position, if they are tired today, if they want to do a specific activity, or if they had a good day at school.

These are all factors that can impact my session and most importantly, optimize the session for my patient.  The CHAT Collective® hand bands are so versatile and useful for so many different diagnoses.  Each patient who is able to use these bands can now have a better physical therapy session.”

Says Holly Quinn, DPT PT

CHAT Collective® hand bands are color-coded rubber wristbands which are designed to be worn by verbal communicators to obtain information from or to discern the preferences of nonverbal and limited communicators. These portable and inexpensive tools are invaluable as back-up systems when Alternative and Augmentative Communications (AAC) devices are inaccessible or fail — or when a person with a communications challenge becomes separated from his or her caretaker. Our hand bands are convenient, easy-to-use and effective in both emergency and social situations:  the verbal questioner simply poses Yes/No questions to the NVC/LC respondent who indicates the wristband that correlates to his/her answers. The bright green “yes” and red “no” CHAT Collective hand bands are sold together in packs of five and come with sample questions for verbal communicators and instructions for respondents on audibly, physically or visually signaling their answers.  Tested and endorsed by speech and language pathologists, the CHAT Collective hand bands are suitable for communicating with anyone who is verbally challenged as a result of birth, stroke, traumatic brain or other injuries. Or hand bands are ideal for:

  • Family members and friends
  • Teachers & therapists
  • Medical and safety personnel

 

TIPS FOR TALKING WITH NONVERBAL AND LIMITED COMMUNICATORS

Socialization is critical to the intellectual and emotional health of all verbal, nonverbal and limited communicators. Learning to ask questions that require simple “Yes” or “No” answers is a valuable skill for anyone who needs or wishes to converse with someone who has communications challenges. Once the concept of using the CHAT Collective® hand bands to offer Yes/No options has been introduced (see directions on hand band product packaging), verbal questioners, who wear the bands, can easily carry on conversations that lead to deeper relationships with NVC/LCs.  Below are sample Yes/No questions for common situations and conversation topics:

Instead of “How do you feel?” ask “Do you feel OK?”

Other examples:

  • Are you in pain?
  • Does it hurt when I push here?
  • Did this hurt yesterday? Two days ago?
  • Do you understand why I’m doing this?

Instead of “What is your favorite food?” ask “Is pasta your favorite food?”

Other examples:

  • Do you like this restaurant? Food?
  • Are you hungry? Thirsty?
  • Do you want chicken?
  • Are you all done?

Instead of “Who are your friends here?” ask “Is Bill one of your friends?”

Other examples:

  • Is Julie nice to you?
  • Do you want to see your cousin?
  • Do you know that person?
  • Do you remember Charlie?

Instead of “What do you want?” ask “Do you want me to buy some bananas?”

Other examples:

  • Do you need more tissues?
  • Do you like clothes shopping?
  • Do you like the red one better than the blue one?
  • Do you have enough money to purchase that?

Instead of “Where do you go to school?” ask “Are you in school?”

Other examples:

  • Do you like school?
  • Do you like reading better than math?
  • Is your teacher nice?
  • Do you understand this question?

Instead of “What do you like to do?” ask “Do you like to watch game shows?”

Other examples:

  • Is Frozen your favorite movie?
  • Do you want John to do this with you?
  • Do you want me to read a book to you?
  • Are you better at this than your brother?

Instead of “Who is your favorite team?” ask “Do you like (name of team) better than (name of team)?”

Other examples:

  • Is your team winning?
  • Did you like to play soccer?
  • Do you know someone on the team?
  • Do you understand the rules?

Instead of “How are you?” ask “Are you having a good day?”

Other examples:

  • Are you happy?
  • Do you like the weather today?
  • Do you like this place?
  • Do you want me to help you with that?